New Schools and Child Care Spaces Coming to Communities Across Ontario
New Schools and Child Care Spaces Coming to Communities Across Ontario

Province Investing in Additions, Repairs and Upgrades at 79 Schools
 
January 15, 2018

Ontario is supporting families in communities across the province, with new schools, 
additions and renovations that will create better, modern learning environments 
and more licensed child care spaces.
 
Mitzie Hunter, Minister of Education, and Indira Naidoo-Harris, Minister Responsible 
for Early Years and Child Care, were joined by Laura Albanese, MPP for York 
South-Weston, at Dennis Avenue Community School in Toronto today to announce 
funding for 39 brand new schools and 40 major renovations and additions in 
communities across Ontario.
 
These projects will also include a total of 157 new child care rooms with more than 
2,700 licensed child care spaces for children aged 0-4, helping more families access 
safe and affordable child care closer to home.
 
Ontario's plan to create fairness and opportunity during this period of rapid 
economic change includes a higher minimum wage and better working conditions, 
free tuition for hundreds of thousands of students, easier access to affordable child 
care, and free prescription drugs for everyone under 25 through the biggest 
expansion of medicare in a generation.
 
QUOTES
 
“Ontario is committed to building learning environments that support student 
achievement and well-being. That’s why we continue to invest in new, renovated, 
and expanded schools so that every student can learn and grow in a space that 
enables them to reach their full potential.”
— Mitzie Hunter, Minister of Education
 
“Schools are a natural fit for licensed child care spaces. They provide families with 
access to safe, high-quality care in a convenient setting, and offer young children 
the opportunity to transition into full-day kindergarten in a familiar environment. 
These new spaces will give our youngest learners a strong start in life, and make 
a real difference in the lives of many Ontario families.”
— Indira Naidoo-Harris, Minister Responsible for Early Years and Child Care
 
“I’m thrilled Ontario is making an important investment for the future of York 
South-Weston. These high-quality school buildings will help provide local students 
with better learning environments, while supporting the needs of our growing 
community.” 
— Laura Albanese, MPP for York South-Weston
 
QUICK FACTS
 
• In 2018, Ontario is investing $784 million in 79 new and renovated schools. 
This investment will also create a more than 2,700 new licensed child care spaces 
for children aged 0-4.
• Ontario is providing $10.8 million to help build a new school building for Dennis 
Avenue Community School, and $4.5 million for a four-room addition at the nearby 
George Syme Community School. Each project will include five new child care rooms 
with space for 88 children.
• Since 2013, the government has invested $9.1 billion in capital funding to support 
more than 160 new schools and more than 460 additions and renovations.
• Ontario is investing up to $1.6 billion in new capital funding over five years to 
support the creation of 45,000 new licensed child care spaces in schools, other 
public spaces and communities.

LEARN MORE

Capital Investments – Improving Ontario’s Schools
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/parents/capital.html

Interactive map of Ontario’s infrastructure investments in transit, hospitals, 
schools, roads and bridges
https://www.ontario.ca/page/building-ontario

Creating More Child Care Spaces
https://www.ontario.ca/page/building-ontario


Richard Francella, Minister’s Office
richard.francella@ontario.ca

Heather Irwin, Communications Branch
heather.irwin@ontario.ca
416-325-2454
Public Inquiries, 416-325-2929 or 1-800-387-5514
TTY 1-800-268-7095
 
More..Posted: Jan 15, 2018
The Armouries as Emergency Shelter
Opening of Moss Park Armouries Necessary But Temporary Measure
More Permanent Shelter Beds Needed

Toronto - January 5, 2018 – Almost a month after officially refusing to request 
the opening of the armouries as emergency shelter, Mayor John Tory has caved 
under mounting pressure and requested the use of the Moss Park armoury. 
Communication from the federal government today indicates that the armoury will 
open tonight as a 24/7 winter respite center for two weeks.

“The immediate opening of the armoury and involvement of all three levels of 
government is a good step and an important victory for homeless people in this 
city," says Gaetan Heroux, a longtime OCAP organizer. "Despite the opening of 
the armouries, it's clear that the city continues to scramble. We still have questions 
about what the Provinces role will be and want to make sure the new space is 
adequate. Also, all winter respite programs end on April 15th but, homelessness 
doesn’t end on April 15th,” Heroux adds.

There were 630 people staying in the Out Of The Colds, 24/7 drop-ins and warming 
centres last night. “In order to meet the demand, at least 630 new permanent beds 
must added to the shelter system by April 15th to ensure that people currently 
forced to stay in winter respite sites and drop-ins have a safe place to go,” says 
OCAP organizer A.J. Withers. “While warming centres will save lives this winter, 
conditions within most are appalling and these facilities don’t necessarily meet 
the City’s own shelter or public health standards. The city is relying on these 
substandard survival spaces but we need permanent beds in the downtown core 
and we need them now.”

We are also calling on Mayor Tory to stop his racist and disablist scapegoating of 
refugees and people with mental health issues. He consistently names these groups 
as part of the cause of the crisis. The shelter crisis has been ongoing for over 
2 decades and has intensified in recent years as a result of Council’s neglect, 
and the housing and income crisis. Social housing units are being boarded up, 
there isn’t enough low income rental housing, and social assistance rates are too 
low. Refugees and people with mental health issues are the casualties of policies 
enacted by all three levels of government.

The way to resolve the shelter crisis is to ensure the shelter system’s capacity 
levels are maintained at 90% - a City Council mandate that has never been met. 
Occupancy rates are consistently 95% or higher which means that it is often 
impossible to get a shelter bed and the shelters are overcrowded, unsafe 
and prone to disease outbreak and bedbugs. The city needs to ensure that 
the budget includes sufficient funds to make that happen. Like many improvements 
to the shelter system over the past decades, OCAP and our allies fought for 
and won the opening of the Moss Park Armoury. OCAP will continue to fight for 
sufficient beds and better conditions within the shelter system, and for social 
housing – and we fight to win.

Media Spokespersons:
A.J. Withers & Gaetan Heroux, OCAP Organizers
647-884-2290

Ontario Coalition Against Poverty
157 Carlton St #201 
Toronto, ON. M5A 2K3
Phone: 416 925 6939
Fax: 1 855 714 0566 (toll free) 
Website: ocap.ca
Twitter: @OCAPtoronto
Facebook: facebook.com/OcapToronto
More..Posted: Jan 06, 2018